Commercial and public spaces: aerial photographs and interactive map help explore Mexico’s Tianguis

0


Commercial and public spaces: aerial photographs and interactive map help explore Mexico’s Tianguis

© Alex González / Dronalexmx© Alex González / Dronalexmx© Alex González / Dronalexmx© Alex González / Dronalexmx+ 6

Commerce has gone through many changes over the past few years, especially as people around the world have found new ways to connect and work with each other. Despite these rapid advances, trade and traditional cultures remain strong in Mexico City’s tianguis, derived from the Nahuatl word. tianquiz (tli) for “Marlet.” These open-air spaces functioned before European invasion and colonization, when barter was the primary form of commerce and transactions took place in large public spaces like plazas and hallways. Eventually, copper and cocoa products became a form of currency with which to buy basic necessities.

According to the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico (INAH), many tianguis still active today can date back to the pre-Hispanic era of Mexican history. These include Cuetzalan Market in Puebla, Tianguistengo and Otumba Market in Mexico State, Tenejapa and San Juan Chamula Market in Chiapas, Chilapa Market in Guerrero, Zacualpan Market from Amilpas to Morelos and from the Ixmiquilpan market in Hidalgo.

© Alex González / Dronalexmx
© Alex González / Dronalexmx

Today, although many commercial spaces in Mexico, including the Central de Abasto de Mexico and the markets of Jamaica, Merced and San Juan, have taken a stationary approach to serving their communities, the tianguis maintain their foothold in Mexican society. and have even adapted to current conditions, such as those caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

© Alex González / Dronalexmx
© Alex González / Dronalexmx

It is fundamental to understand, explore and analyze these semi-permanent spaces in urban and anthropological terms, especially considering their importance for families who come from as far away as other cities and states to sell. their property in the capital. Essentially, they are the representation of an active and dynamic public space animated by cultural and commercial forces.

To get a feel for these culturally and economically important spaces, we invite you to view a series of aerial images captured by Mexican photographer Alex González and explore this interactive map created by Jorge González which includes the exact location and times of the day. opening of Mexico City. 329 tianguis.



Share.

About Author

Comments are closed.