The light designs of Arevik d’Or are deliberately flawed marvels

0


[ad_1]

Thanks to the strength of his original but relevant observations, Arevik’s work has appeared in the pages of the New York Times, De Standaard and even exhibited in Times Square. It’s a multi-faceted lifestyle that suits her perfectly.

“Living an artistic life has always seemed like the only logical option to me,” Arévik told Creative Boom. “Life is usually routine, whereas art breaks with those patterns, and that’s exactly what I need. I’m a very communicative person with a sharp mind, and interaction is essential to my creativity In my work as an illustrator and animator, I can engage in many relationships: with publishers, artistic directors, sound designers, etc …, but also with the stories, concepts and characters that we let’s create from our imagination. All these exchanges inspire me. “



Confidentiality by Arévik d’Or

After honing his self-taught animation skills by completing the master’s program in animation at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent, Arévik found a new source of fascination in the “hard-hitting and stimulating” model drawing courses.

“I discovered how inspiring the human body can be. Even after I finished my studies, I continued to immerse myself in anatomical drawing. This resulted in ANNatomy, a weekly cartoon published in the Belgian newspaper Standaard Magazine. It’s a fun observational reflection on being a stereotypically independent woman. “

In all his drawings, Arévik affirms that the idea takes precedence over the style. If she draws a cartoon she keeps things linear and lights up, and when working on a children’s book she likes to play with shape and color to engage her readers. During this time, the animated characters are determined by their movements. “Either way, I follow my intuition and try to keep it honest and fragile,” she explains. “I stay away from perfectionism and an overworked approach.”

The Fabric of Existence, linocut, ink on paper by Arévik d'Or



The Fabric of Existence, linocut, ink on paper by Arévik d’Or

Crediting his mastery of a good conceptual approach to the influence of artists like Javier Jaen and Christof Nieman, Arévik also draws on the humor of Sempé and Edward Steed, as well as on the aesthetics of Matisse or Picasso. “But for my cartoons, there is nothing more inspiring than observing everyday life in detail.”

And for Arévik, following these creative impulses can become a kind of compulsion. “New experiences and discoveries give me that adrenaline rush. It’s like I fall in love over and over again. It can be a sculpture, a beautiful textile pattern, a mosaic or a text, whatever. It can make me cry. these moments, I can’t help but try to get closer to what gives me that strong emotion. When I create, I transform that accumulated emotional energy into deep satisfaction. I’m addicted to that feeling. ”

She adds: “Every time I open my website I see all the little animations that I have done in collaboration with illustrator and my studio partner Klaas Verplancke. Every gif reminds me of a rewarding experience. This year we are planning to start working together on our first animated short. I can’t wait for that. “

Home Sweet Office, concept and illustration by Klaas Verplancke, animation and sound by Arévik d’Or

The New Normal, concept and illustration by Klaas Verplancke, animation and sound by Arévik d’Or

Free as a Bird, concept and illustration by Klaas Verplancke, animation and sound by Arévik d’Or

[ad_2]

Share.

About Author

Leave A Reply